Healthy Habits to Start in 2022

There’s no denying that health and happiness go hand in hand. However, during this time, straight after Christmas, many of us aren’t feeling our healthiest, and thus, aren’t at our happiest. Getting to the stage where you feel healthy and happy again may seem impossible, but what you need is to get into a habit. If you’re looking for a small change that’s easy to incorporate into your busy day-to-day life as a student, we have just what you need. The beginning of the year is the perfect time to build good habits into your day.

So, in today’s blog, the team here at Student Housing Lancaster have whittled down some of the best healthy habits to begin right now. We understand how busy and stressful student life can be, so starting these healthy practices early on can help you smoothly switch from the indulgence of last year to a new, healthier and happier you.

The Science Behind Habits

It is a fact those who practice healthy habits like eating well, exercising regularly, and getting enough sleep tend to live happier and more fulfilling lives. We should practice exercise, eat well, sleep enough hours, avoid toxins, and take care of our mental health. But, of course, some things are outside of our control, like genetic predisposition and autoimmune disease. If you suffer from your mental health, pulling yourself out of a slump and getting into a healthy habit like a sensible sleeping pattern may seem impossible. Speak to your friends, family, tutors, mental wellbeing staff at university, or even talk to our team here – we will always do our best to help out tenants and guide them in the right direction.

Female student yawning with coffee in hand on pink background

Getting a Good Amount of Sleep

Sleep is one of the most critical parts of our day. It is a basic of health that lots of declared healthy people neglect. Getting 8 hours of sleep per night can reduce stress, improve productivity, and give your body time to rest. Would you like to wake up fresh and ready for the day? Eliminate bad practices before going to bed. An important one is to get rid of bedroom distractions like a tablet, phone, television, and other bright light sources that can disrupt your brain’s sleep signals.

But creating better sleep habits requires more than improving your bedtime routine. Another great way to improve your sleep is getting enough sunlight exposure during the day. In addition, finding ways to help your brain relax before bed and throughout the day is crucial. Mindfulness meditation can help. If you don’t get enough sleep, your health will suffer: Lower energy, higher stress levels, a weaker immune system, and the list goes on.

Drink Water Regularly

Your body needs hydration to function at its best, especially when you’re studying. So, get into the habit of drinking a glass of water as soon as you wake up (before the coffee). Drink a glass with every meal, bring a bottle to university with you, and drink a full glass before bed. Before you know it, you will have consumed the NHS recommended six to eight glasses of water. Like sleeping schedules, hydration can bring you incredible benefits in your day-to-day life. Think clearer skin, fewer headaches, and more energy.

Take the Stairs

We used to think that to be fit and healthy, you needed to do intense workouts or be able to run a half marathon on your lunch break. However, that’s not the case, and everyone needs to start somewhere. So, make small changes in your life such as walking to your lectures instead of getting the bus or taking the stairs rather than the lift. Walking is a fantastic form of exercise and is suitable for people of all fitness levels. It also has great mental health benefits as it gets you out of the house and into the fresh air. Once you get into the habit of walking more, try walking a little further and exploring the city and beyond – you may just find your new favourite study space or independent café you would never have stumbled on otherwise.

Students walking up stairs at a university

Get Into Cooking

Cooking a meal for yourself can be fun as well as healthy. It allows you to control what goes into your food, helping to limit excess calories, fat, sugar, sodium, or whatever you’re looking to cut down on. Simply adding fruit and vegetables to every meal is a healthy habit that will soon become second nature. Are you making mac and cheese? Add some broccoli or cauliflower. Do you like peanut butter on toast? Add on a banana. These swaps are simple, but the benefits are endless, and they don’t stop you from enjoying your favourite things; they just add a little extra nutrition. Your body and mind will thank you.

Reduce screen time

Nowadays, we are guilty of spending most of the day connected to a screen, which can be difficult to avoid while studying. While technology has many advantages, it also has a dark side. If you’re the type of person who stares at a screen all day, it’s even more important to take a step back at some point. Social media, studies, TV, laptop, phone and more are responsible for too much time in front of a screen which can cause headaches, stress and eye problems. So prioritise your screentime for studying, but remember to take regular breaks away from the computer – it’s as simple as walking around the student flats in Lancaster every few hours; your mind and body will feel refreshed and rejuvenated.

Study at the Right Times

Are you a morning person? Good news for you, as this is the best time to get on with your studies. You are well-rested, rejuvenated from your full eight hours of sleep, and ready for the day with a clear mind. It has been proven that your concentration is the best in the mornings, so use this time wisely and don’t pick up your phone as soon as you wake up. Instead, get some healthy breakfast and pick up your university work. Additionally, use this time (when others may still be tucked up in bed) to plan out the rest of your day. Plan the study times that suit you, and don’t forget to add in your well-deserved breaks.

Student studying in the morning with breakfast

Do not hesitate and start today. And remember, if you’re looking for student accommodation in Lancaster, we’re the place to go. Feel free to get in touch to learn more about how we can help you.

If you like to know about our options for undergraduate or Lancaster university postgraduate accommodation, visit our website and find out more.

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